a little eco friendly packaging tip

This year I have been lucky enough to have Forage items on display in Bluebird Vintage, a great¬†shop in Boonton, NJ. Not only is it a great place for locals to become familiar and browse some of my items but it is also a super place for them to pick up their custom orders! When I drop off their bags of goodies, I of course have to label them so that we know which bag belongs to which person. I’m always trying to use recycled materials for my packaging, but sometimes, well it just isn’t pretty. ¬†For my bag labels, I came up with a cute, easy and eco friendly way to do so. I cut up the back page of old calendars. (you know the page that shows you the tiny version of all the pretty photos or illustrations that will be featured every month?) They make the prefect size gift tag!

I thought I’d pass on this fun idea for you to try with your own gifts. So before you recycle that old calendar, save the last page for your gift tags! Or better yet, if your package is small enough, use the corresponding calendar page for your wrapping paper! They are can be recycled after (re)use!

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*Bluebird Vintage is located at 906 Main Street in Boonton, NJ

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The beauty in the damage

The beauty in the damage

I have been a wood lover for far longer than I have been a woodworker. I often admired (still do) the beautiful patterns in the wood, the colors , the rings, the stories. But when I first started making my items I was always looking for “clean” wood. I thought my wood burning designs had to stand out against a stark white maple background, but, being a forager, this was not often what I was given. Gathering fallen wood from my property or my friends wood piles or the side of the road, often I get soggy wood that needs to be dried out a bit before I can work with it. This wetness seeps into the wood often creating irregularities and patterns. My frustration has evolved into fascination with these “damaged” pieces of wood that I work with. “Mother Nature’s watercolors” is how I have come to think of it. It turns out that not surprisingly, I am not the only one who has found beauty in the damage. The term for it is spalted, and many a woodworker has come to value these pieces highly.
Perfection is boring, give me your discards any day.